Rouleur Classic

Judges announced for 1 Awards 2015

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We are happy to announce the judges for the 2015 1 Awards, which celebrates the best from the past racing season.
The select panel of seven, comprising some of the finest former riders and shrewdest minds in professional cycling, have chosen their winners for each category.
The rider with the most votes is the winner; you can see the shortlisted riders and categories here.
We will be publishing the award winners, alongside the judges’ reasoning, on next week.
They will also be recognised at the 1 Classic on November 19. We’ll also ask you to vote, with the chance to win a copy of 1 signed by judge Sean Kelly.
Sean Kelly (below) is a cycling legend. The Irishman won Paris-Roubaix twice, Milan-Sanremo twice, Liège-Bastogne-Liège, the Tour of Lombardy and four Tour de France points jerseys among many other victories. As a commentator for British Eurosport on all three Grand Tours, he is known for his shrewd observations on the sport. He was on the panel of last year’s inaugural 1 Awards.
David Millar is a former professional rider, who won three Tour de France stages during an 18-year career. He is the first Briton to wear the leader’s jersey in all three Grand Tours. He has his own clothing collection, Chpt. III, made by Castelli.
Stuart O’Grady is a former winner of Paris-Roubaix and two-time Tour de France stage winner. In between braving the horrendous time difference to catch big bike races on TV, he runs Adelaide café and cycling centre, The Vélo Precinct.
Erik Dekker (below) was one of the most canny riders of his era, winning the Amstel Gold Race, Paris-Tours and the UCI World Cup during a long and distinguished career. The Dutchman is a directeur sportif for LottoNL-Jumbo.
Roger Hammond is a former cyclo-cross junior world champion, British national road race champion and cobbled Classics contender, finishing second at Ghent-Wevelgem and third in Paris-Roubaix. He is the team manager of Madison-Genesis.
10 is Editor of 1 Magazine. A lifelong cyclist, he has attempted most disciplines of the sport with unfailing mediocrity. He is now retired from racing and considering starting a Slow Cycling Movement.
157 is Editor of Only a total absence of cycling talent prevented his ascension to the professional ranks. He finds solace in writing about the sport he loves.

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