Rouleur Classic

Larry Warbasse: domestique, occasional leader, full-time rouleur

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Photographs: IAM / Merot
Larry Warbasse: domestique, occasional leader, full-time rouleur

As I’m new here at 1, I was asked to tell you all a little bit about who I am. While my name may not ring bells for many, I hope you’ll enjoy my writings nonetheless. I am a professional cyclist and a cycling fan. An avid writer, a less avid reader.
A son, a brother, a boyfriend. A passionate consumer of food, as well as an aspiring creator of it. I think too much, talk too often and question more than I should. Sometimes good, sometimes bad, rarely in between. More often than not, I am a domestique, occasional leader, a climber on my good days, time-trial specialist here and there, but always a 1.
I wear many different hats and they differ by day. But in my journals, however, I am a cyclist taking you with me on my journey through the European peloton: in training, in races and in everyday life. I expect it to be a bit like my path as a racer – there is a planned route in mind, but there are many ups and downs, twists and turns, bumps and detours.
I once read that the best writing is the most honest, so I will do my best to honour that in the coming months. People often tell me I’m living the dream, but as with dreams, you have sweet ones and you have nightmares. I hope to share the good, but I know there will be bad as well. Let’s just hope there’s some comedy in the mishaps.
Now you know what to expect, here’s a bit more about me: my name is 20. I ride for the Swiss team IAM Pro Cycling. I am American and often get prodded for it. That’ll happen when you’re the only one on the team.
I’m from a small town called Traverse City, Michigan, but Nice, France is where I reside and call home during the season. 2016 will be my fourth year in the professional peloton and if all goes to plan, my best season to date.
My first years as a pro had plenty of hiccups. I think everyone goes through growing pains when they make the jump to the professional ranks, although some more than others.
I struggled with moving so far from home, knowing hardly anyone, living in a new environment. With each passing year I have grown more comfortable living abroad, more adjusted to the professional cycling lifestyle, and more accustomed to the quirks of racing at the highest level. By no means have I figured it all out yet – far from it, in fact – which is half of the fun. I hope to take you along on some of the lessons I learn, and I assure you, there will be many.
From dying in the gutter of some crosswindy backwoods race in France, crying up the highest mountain passes in Italy to flying down some crazy roads in Spain. From the struggles of weight loss to the everlasting search for more power.
From the disappointment of defeat, the elation of victory, to the simple smiles and chatter shared on the coffee spins, I look forward to bringing you along for this ride. You can sit on my wheel – this time, it’s ok…
Until next time,

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